7 Interesting Coffee Facts You Didn’t Know

1. Brazil knows their coffee

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As the worlds largest producer of coffee, Brazil produces 25% of the world’s coffee supply. 80% of the coffee that comes from Brazil is Arabica (a type off coffee bean that is typically mild and aromatic).

2. LIGHT VS. DARK COFFEE

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Light roasts may seem weaker because of the various meanings of the word “light.” They also tend to taste more delicate and floral, which may lead us to believe they pack less power than a bold flavored dark roast. However, caffeine levels actually lower as the roast darkens.

3. COLD BREW = LESS ACID

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Cold Brew coffee refers to the process of steeping coffee grounds in room temperature or cold water for long periods of time. Unlike iced coffee, which is hot brewed coffee over ice, cold brew never comes in contact with heated water and is intended to lower the acidity of the coffee.

4. DARK ROASTS ARE MORE OILY

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Although coffee that’s oily after roasting can be a sign of freshness: not all coffee will end up excreting the same amounts of oil. Typically the darker the roast, the more oil you are likely to see on the surface of the bean.

5. BEACHES + BEANS

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Coffee may be harvested year-round in Hawaii but the primary season starts at the end of summer and can last up until the beginning of spring. Kona coffee is a well known coffee grown on the Big Island. This coffee is grown in the rich volcanic soil on the slopes of the active Mauna Loa volcano where frequent precipitation keeps the plants nourished and protected from the intense sunlight.

6. *ORDERS MORE ESPRESSO*

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The main difference between espresso and drip coffee is the preparation method. Unfortunately, espresso beans are not grown from a special and magical plant. Espresso is typically prepared with a much finer grind than drip coffee and these grinds are tamped with about 30-40 pounds of pressure.

7. LAND OF THE CAFFEINATED

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Tea drinking was all the rage when America was still a British Colony. Yet after the Boston Tea Party, this became very unpopular among American patriots. Fast forward to the 70s and 80s, coffee became increasingly popular in the U.S. because of the marketing of percolators.

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